I had great plans for today’s post. Yesterday was a clear day up here, so I snapped a photo from the mall parking lot, where you have Ulster’s best view of the mountains. Then came the forecast for bad weather, so this morning I woke up and took a picture of the six inches of snow outside. But then I read about Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch penning a song about Hanukkah, and that trumps everything else. In the world.

Ya gotta admit, it’s a pretty good time for the Jews. A Details article published this month titled “The Rise of the Hot Jewish Girl” claims “the Fran Drescher rep has given way to a more smoldering image” of Jewish women. (It should be mentioned that this article is currently the most read, commented and e-mailed story on the site.) Seth Rogen, Jason Segel and the rest of the semitic Apatow gang have climbed the Hollywood ranks with such recent hits as Pineapple ExpressSuperbad and Forgetting Sarah Marshall. Israel is closer than ever to securing the release of captured solider Gilad Shalit.

But you know things are looking up when a Mormon senator from Utah writes a song for one of your holidays. And not even an important holiday (but we don’t let the goyimknow that)! Hanukkah doesn’t get a mention in the Torah. It doesn’t have its own book, like Purim does. Hanukkah gets its own little sections in Target and Hallmark because it’s a December holiday. But Senator Hatch, if you want to pen a ditty about the Festival of Lights, then you go right ahead, sir.

Hanukkah is all about miracles. The oil lasted for eight days, the weak, inexperienced Maccabees defeated the Antiochus and his army, we don’t all suffer massive heart attacks during the eight days of latkes and doughnuts. But Tablet‘s Jeffrey Goldberg notes the latest miracle: “a Mormon senator in a studio with an Arab singer and a bunch of New York Jewish background vocalists recording a Hanukkah song of his own making.” Who ever would have imagined that scenario? So thank you, Senator Hatch, for reminding us that this Hanukkah is all about the unexpected.

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