And I’m not using that term loosely. Now that summer camp has started, our days off are random and not guaranteed to be consecutive. This week, I’ve got Tuesday and Wednesday off, which is nice, since a friend is coming into Seoul before leaving Korea on Tuesday and Tisha b’Av starts on Wednesday night. Last week, I had Wednesday and Saturday off. I did very little on Wednesday, but I blame that on Donny’s “Tuesday Night Wing Night” and a few Long Island iced teas. Come Saturday, I was determined to be productive.

I’ve blogged elsewhere about World Press Photo, and my love of it exceeds most things, mac and cheese included. I’ve been checking the site for months, waiting for the list of exhibitions to be updated. Imagine my shock and excitement when I saw it would be in Seoul this summer!

The exhibition officially opened at the Seoul Arts Center near Gangnam on Saturday, and I went later in the day when the hall wasn’t so crowded. A regular adult ticket was ₩8,000, about six bucks.

This year’s exhibition had on display photos featuring the economic collapse, the cyclone in Myanmar and urban poverty, in addition to lighter images of entertainers, animals and Olympic athletes. I encourage you all to check out the exhibition calendar to see if WPP will be in a city near you in the next few months.

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I had a few hours to kill afterwards, so I settled down in the museum's cafe and knocked back a chai latte and finished Colin Martin's "Welcome to Hell: One Man's Fight for Life Inside the Bangkok Hilton"

I had a few hours to kill afterwards, so I settled down in the museum's cafe and knocked back a chai latte and finished Colin Martin's Welcome to Hell: One Man's Fight for Life Inside the Bangkok Hilton

Of course, the best day off ever would not–could not–be complete without some delicious food. I met up with some coworkers in Seoul’s food mecca, Apgujeong, for a trip to Butterfinger Pancakes. I’ve been hearing about Butterfinger ever since winter camp, when Joyce and Hannah would rave about the (slightly overpriced) breakfast-for-dinner meals. With Hannah back for summer camp, we finally had motivation to schlep out to Apgujeong (a good hour away from Suyu, using public transportation).

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There were eleven of us in total, and we probably filled a third of the seats in the tiny room. Thankfully, the smart guys at Butterfinger let us order while we waited for tables to open.

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It’s been a good ten months since I’ve eaten at a diner. While my omelette, two pancakes and hashbrowns satisfied my intense craving, my wallet took the heat. As expected, western food in Korea is much pricier than say, American food in the States, or Korean food in Seoul. My meal came to about ₩16,000, which still isn’t bad when you compare that to prices back home. In defense of the prices, however, it should be said that you really get what you pay for. My meal was enough for dinner and then lunch the next day. I imagine that poor Lisa is still eating her way through her salad:

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So, bottom line: Would I recommend Butterfinger Pancakes? Absolutely. It doesn’t matter if you’ve been here a week, a month or even a year–there is nothing quite like homestyle diner food. Now, if only they sold Butterfinger candy bars…

 

The Butterfinger Original Omelette--omelette with various veggies and American cheese, plus two pancakes (with maple syrup and honey butter) and a side of well-seasoned hashbrowns

The Butterfinger Original Omelette--omelette with various veggies and American cheese, plus two pancakes (with maple syrup and honey butter) and a side of well-seasoned hashbrowns

 

Butterfinger Pancakes calls itself "my kind of place." They couldn't be more right.

Butterfinger Pancakes calls itself "my kind of place." They couldn't be more right.

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